Best Electric And Acoustic Guitars For Blues – 2020

Blues Guitars

Let’s just accept that going to the shop to buy a guitar for the first time could be daunting. Thousands of instruments in varying types, colors, or sizes hanging from walls and ceilings. You need to get the best out of the buck you’ve been collecting over the last month or 15 years. You would like to select one and actually play “Stairway To Heaven” right away. The only question of preference continues to remain. Should I buy this one? Which of those is perfect for you and your spending plan, or perhaps your level of skill? This is expected to clear the dust.

Initially, you have to choose the “correct” form of guitar for you. This involves deciding if you are going to go for the Acoustic or Electric Guitars. All through this “guide,” you’ll always be told to listen to what’s played in the music that you love to listen to and get the nearest equivalent to. Very evidently, that’s the tactic you have to understand, and that anything below this point just repeats itself to convince you. But what is really played in your earpieces or the nearest thing to it? If you have the blues, you need to articulate oneself on the guitar.

There really are no two methods to do that. You could even sit from around the house and the mope, and it perhaps wouldn’t make users feel good. Ultimately, your friends will also get tired of listening to you.

A few of the finest music of all time has come from of the lives of guitarists who have been betrayed by a buddy, who has lost a lover, who’s been fired from their work, who have been laid out of their family home, or just a kid who wanted to play the guitar.

So, what did they do about it? They took the guitar and started playing it.

This guide will outline some of the most widely known guitar brands in the market. We will also try to keep you down to a spending plan of less than $1000 since there are a lot of reasonably priced blues guitars around here. The guitars in this review are not just great blues guitars, they’re going to take you through rock, and even jazz music. Starting to play blues nowadays often involves playing it in the frame of reference of some kind of rock. The blues was what helped lead to the birth of the rock ‘n’ roll, and the two were forever and interwoven.

Many blues guitarists really want to indulge in jazz too though, so we have to pick flexible guitars and can get the job done for both genres.

The Concept of “Blues Guitar”

It’s important to note that the idea of “Blues Guitar” has to be in our imaginations. When it comes to feeling, there was no such thing. Purchasing a Custom Fender Stratocaster doesn’t bring you any closer to playing Blues than purchasing a shovel and hammering a string to it. But the shovel can generate a lot of Blues if you put your heart in it. So bearing in mind that in the right hands, the shovel will sound much better we will try to establish some rules to help you choose the right first Blues guitar.

Observing Your Favorite Guitarists

Firstly, find out what you’re paying attention to. Gratefully, take a pen and paper and put down the best ten guitarists. Then go try looking up what they’re doing, as the odds are that the songs you want would imitate the music you like to hear. If you assume 5 out of 10 Blues Guitarists you appreciate playing Strat, you must try seeking Stratocaster in your spending limit. Fender produces them for anything from a $100 onwards,

Best Guitars For Blues

Let’s move on to some of our top picks for blues guitars:

1. Fender Stratocaster

Are you a blues music player? Or a jazz music player? Well, in both cases Fender Stratocaster will fit you. These guitars are sold by a California based company known as Fender mainly for playing blues music. This guitar comes in a variety of models.

All Stratocasters have a 5-way pickup selector switch. It contains both switches and controls for playing different tones. The Stratocasters have a unique shaped headstock as well, along with all the tuners on the sides. It contains a vibrato system. The company wanted a guitar to have a vibrato system instead of a bridge and after a failed attempt on the first vibrato system, the second proved to be much more than just what the designer had thought. The bodies of the Stratocasters are still made of wood, namely Ash and Alder.

Each Stratocaster neck varies from one another with very slight differences in the C shape of the neck. The frets are the same, i.e. 22 in all of the guitars. There are three neck styles for the C shape of the guitar. The C itself is much less deep than the other two similar ones, which are V and U shapes.

Key features:

  • Made of Alder wood
  • Stratocasters featured in the deluxe range are made of Ash
  • Stand between warm and bright and produce a clearer sound
  • Frets are different in all the guitars. They can be a medium jumbo, vintage or jumbo frets
  • American Standard Stratocaster has three stock pickups at the neck, middle or bridge position
  • 9-inch radius fingerboard

Pros:

  • A large variety of guitars in this category
  • Vibrato system
  • Under one-thousand dollars
  • Various neck shapes
  • Versatile

Cons:

  • Thin sound

2. Gibson Less Paul:

This guitar first sold in 1952 by the Gibson guitar corporation. It is a solid mahogany guitar with a carved maple top and a fretboard made of Rosewood. The guitar consists of two pickups and volume and tone controls. It has a stop tail bridge, but there are some which have a different bridge. The guitars are versatile and can be used in various types of music such as blues, jazz, rock, country pop, soul, etc.

If you are looking for a guitar that is an all-rounder with the right amount of pickups; whether they are PAF humbucker pickups or two pickups, this guitar is all that you need. The Gibson Les Paul is an ideal blues guitar because it’s highly customizable. Whether you’d like to play clean, or you’re continuing to drive it tougher with some disturbance for some Blues-Rock, it’s going to do it all, and it’s going to sound great while you’re doing it. There’s no kind of music that this guitar can’t do thanks to the PAF-style humbucker pickups.

Kudos to a single-cutaway layout, you have access to the highest frets – ideal for those high-end solo lines and the comfy rosewood fretboards (now back on the Gibson Original Line) is a breeze to play with.

Key features:

  • Mahogany tonewoods
  • PAF humbucker pickups
  • Slim Taper necks
  • The top is carved maple
  • Two pickups
  • Volume and tone controls
  • Stop tail bridge in some of the guitars
  • Scale: 24.75 inches

Pros:

  • Strong and reliable
  • Low-frequency tones

Cons:

  • Expensive
  • Not suitable for playing chords
Gibson Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar, Ebony
  • Body Wood: Chambered mahogany
  • Top wood: Plain maple
  • Scale Length: 24-3/4"
  • Neck Joint: Set-in
  • Neck Wood: Mahogany

3. Fender telecaster:

These guitars have been selling since 1951. They are known to be very simple guitars with very common body shapes. It has bolt-on-neck meaning screws to join the neck and body. Additionally, it contains a string-through bridge and an S/S pickup configuration. Some changes have been made in the modern versions of the guitar, but the twang factors are all the same. The Telecaster also was the guitar of preference in the final battle among Devil’s guitarist (Steve Vai) and Ralph Macchio’s character in Crossroads, a movie based loosely on the renowned blues musician Robert Johnson.

While its look and shape of the have managed to remain the same over the decades, there’s been a few minor changes that make a massive impact. The Fender American Professional Telecaster showcases an Ash body and also V-Mod single-coil pickups that enhance support, provide greater dynamics, and remove that single-coil hum which can sometimes occur on older models, so turning your amp and appreciating the tones inside your guitar won’t be an issue.

Key features:

  • Made of Ash
  • Three-position pickup switch
  • Scale Length: 25.5 inches
  • A pickup at the neck and a pickup at the bridge
  • U neck

Pros:

  • Bolt-on-neck
  • Solid-Body
  • Has a signature sound
  • The neck allows easy movement of fingers

Cons:

  • Less number of tonal options
  • The weaker neck pick up than a Stratocaster
  • Has a neck that many would find too wide
Fender Player Telecaster Electric Guitar - Maple Fingerboard - 3 Color Sunburst
  • Guitar Bridge System: Hardtail Bridge
  • Hand Orientation: Right-Handed
  • Guitar Pickup Configuration: Single-Coil

4. Epiphone ES-335 PRO:

This blues guitar was introduced in the ’50s as Epiphone ES-335 only and played classic rock music initially. Epiphone ES-335 PRO was introduced later with additional features. It is one of the best guitars for blues.

It has a double-cutaway body shape with either a semi-hollow or chambered body type. The neck is made up of Mahogany, and the scale length of the guitar is 24.75 inches. Its fretboard is made of Rosewood and is a medium-jumbo size.

Key features:

  • Solid-body which ensures better feedback
  • Mahogany body
  • Made lightweight using ‘Ulta Modern’ weight relief method
  • Asymmetrical Slim Taper neck
  • Modern contoured heels
  • Alnico classic PRO Dual pickup humbuckers
  • Tune-o-Matic bridge
  • Stop bar tailpiece
  • Includes Wilkinson vintage-style tuning machines
  • Rosewood fretboard
  • Medium Jumbo frets
  • Truss rod at the neck
  • Double-cutaway body shape
  • Pickups have own controls for volume and tone
  • Coil Split lock tone

Pros:

  • Humbuckers
  • Coil tap
  • Can be used to play many musical styles
  • Versatile
  • Good finish

Cons:                

  • No single coil sound
Epiphone Limited Edition ES-335 PRO Electric Guitar Cherry
  • "Arched maple top and back24.75"" Scale set-in mahogany neckRosewood fretboard with small block inlay22 Medium jumbo fretsAlnico Classic Pro neck humbucker with coil-splitAlnico Classic Pro Plus bridge humbucker with coil-splitLockTone tune-o-matic bridgeLockTone stopbar tailpieceWilkinson vintage-style tunersCase sold separately"
  • "24.75"" Scale set-in mahogany neck"
  • Rosewood fretboard with small block inlay
  • 22 Medium jumbo frets
  • Alnico Classic Pro neck humbucker with coil-split

EndNote

As for anything else, we’re going back to the feel of the Blues Guitar. You have to go to the guitar store and be there standing in front of all those in your price bracket, and wait till one of them moves into your hands. You’re going to know that this is the one you pick it up. Please ensure you just take something that you can purchase, even though I assure you and with each higher price point you will be better off, and then it will take much longer for you to begin.

Enough that, inside of your spending plan, connect all the guitars that got your attention into a costly amp as well as play with without anybody else trying to rush you to make a choice. This is going to be your “first guitar” for life, and a wrong decision can prevent you from playing. We really don’t want to do that. Hold it, glance at it, experience it w your hearts and get it when you realize you’ve made the correct decision.